Life-giving—Life-changing Redemption

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Reading: Psalm 105
(Verses 39-45)
He spread out a cloud as a covering,
and a fire to give light at night.
They asked, and he brought them quail;
he fed them well with the bread of heaven.
He opened the rock, and water gushed out;
it flowed like a river in the desert.
For he remembered his holy promise
given to his servant Abraham.
He brought out his people with rejoicing,
his chosen ones with shouts of joy;
he gave them the lands of the nations,
and they fell heir to what others had toiled for—
that they might keep his precepts
and observe his laws.
Praise the LORD (NIV).*

2021-02-09

Late afternoon winter sunshine — photo by David Kitz

Reflection
In the previous readings from Psalm 105, the psalmist described the LORD’s covenant relationship with His chosen people, the descendants of Abraham. The psalm then proceeds to outline the redemption and release of the people of Israel from cruel bondage and oppression in Egypt. Today’s reading celebrates God’s provision for them in the wilderness and their arrival in the Promised Land.

He brought out his people with rejoicing, his chosen ones with shouts of joy; he gave them the lands of the nations, and they fell heir to what others had toiled for—that they might keep his precepts and observe his laws.

There is a striking parallel between the Old Testament redemption of the people of Israel and the New Testament redemption of the Christian believer. Paul, the apostle draws our attention to this parallel experience in the tenth chapter of his first letter to the Corinthians. For I do not want you to be ignorant of the fact, brothers and sisters, that our ancestors were all under the cloud and that they all passed through the sea. They were all baptized into Moses in the cloud and in the sea. They all ate the same spiritual food and drank the same spiritual drink; for they drank from the spiritual rock that accompanied them, and that rock was Christ (1 Corinthians 10:1-4).

In today’s psalm portion we read: He opened the rock, and water gushed out; it flowed like a river in the desert. From Paul’s writing we understand that the opened rock was Christ. On the cross he was opened and water and blood gushed out. Life-giving—life-changing redemption flowed out to all who will receive him. Yet to all who did receive him, to those who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God—children born not of natural descent, nor of human decision or a husband’s will, but born of God (John 1:12-13).

Response: Father God, I live in thanksgiving for the Rock that was opened for my redemption. By faith I receive you. Today, I drink in your new life and your redemptive purpose for me. Praise the LORD! Amen.

Your Turn: Is the Rock accompanying you as you travel through the wilderness of this life?

* New International Version, Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica

The first volume of Psalms 365: Develop a Life of Worship and Prayer by award-winning author David Kitz is now available. For a closer look at this 262-page daily devotional book click here.

Book Trailer

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A journey to the cross is a journey to repentance. It’s a journey to deep personal change. This year during this Lenten season will you take this journey with me?

To download a free study guide for this high-impact, bible-based novel visit: https://www.davidkitz.ca/centurion.php/free study guide PDF

For book reviews and purchases of The Soldier Who Killed a King try Amazon or christianbook.com.

Light Dawns for the Upright

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I will praise the LORD!

symmetrical photography of clouds covered blue sky

Photo by James Wheeler on Pexels.com

Praise the LORD.
   Blessed are those who fear the LORD,
    who find great delight in his commands.

Their children will be mighty in the land;
    the generation of the upright will be blessed.
Wealth and riches are in their houses,
    and their righteousness endures forever.
Even in darkness light dawns for the upright,
    for those who are gracious and compassionate and righteous.
Good will come to those who are generous and lend freely,
    who conduct their affairs with justice.

(Psalm 112:1-5, NIV)*

* New International Version, Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica

The first volume of Psalms 365: Develop a Life of Worship and Prayer by award-winning author David Kitz is now available. For a closer look at this 262-page daily devotional book click here.

He Provided Redemption

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I will praise the LORD!

020200908-EFFECTS

Late summer wild flowers — photo by David Kitz

He has shown his people the power of his works,
    giving them the lands of other nations.
The works of his hands are faithful and just;
    all his precepts are trustworthy.
They are established for ever and ever,
    enacted in faithfulness and uprightness.
He provided redemption for his people;
    he ordained his covenant forever—
    holy and awesome is his name.

The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom;
    all who follow his precepts have good understanding.
    To him belongs eternal praise.

(Psalm 111:6-10, NIV)*

* New International Version, Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica

The first volume of Psalms 365: Develop a Life of Worship and Prayer by award-winning author David Kitz is now available. For a closer look at this 262-page daily devotional book click here.

Undeserved Love!

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Today’s quote and prayer from Psalms 365
Heavenly Father,
thank you for the effort expended
to rescue me from the grip of sin.
I appreciate you, Lord Jesus.
You were willing to lay down your life for me.
What awesome, undeserved love!
Amen.

The first volume of Psalms 365: Develop a Life of Worship and Prayer by award-winning author David Kitz is now available. For a closer look at this 262-page daily devotional book click here.

Redemption Came at a Price

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Reading: Psalm 105
(Verses 23-38)
Then Israel entered Egypt; Jacob resided as a foreigner in the land of Ham.
The L
ORD made his people very fruitful;
he made them too numerous for their foes,
whose hearts he turned to hate his people, to conspire against his servants.
He sent Moses his servant, and Aaron, whom he had chosen.
They performed his signs among them,
his wonders in the land of Ham.
He sent darkness and made the land dark—
for had they not rebelled against his words?
He turned their waters into blood, causing their fish to die.
Their land teemed with frogs,
which went up into the bedrooms of their rulers.
He spoke, and there came swarms of flies,
and gnats throughout their country.
He turned their rain into hail, with lightning throughout their land;
he struck down their vines and fig trees
and shattered the trees of their country.
He spoke, and the locusts came, grasshoppers without number;
 they ate up every green thing in their land, ate up the produce of their soil.
Then he struck down all the firstborn in their land,
the firstfruits of all their manhood.
He brought out Israel, laden with silver and gold,
and from among their tribes no one faltered.
Egypt was glad when they left, because dread of Israel had fallen on them
(NIV).*

2021-01-31 L Kranz

Winter stream near Algonquin Park — photo courtesy of Liz Kranz

Reflection
In its entirety Psalm 105 celebrates the redemption and release of the people of Israel from cruel bondage and oppression in Egypt. They are the LORD’s called out people. That call began with Abraham and was passed down and renewed through the generations as the patriarchs had their own personal encounter with the LORD. With each succeeding generation their covenant with the LORD was reaffirmed.

Today’s reading recounts the actions the LORD undertook to free His people. This psalm portion is filled with powerful verbs—action words. Take a moment to scan through them. The LORD made, sent, turned, spoke, struck and brought. He did not sit back and watch from afar. He got directly involved in rescuing His people.

Redemption takes a concerted effort. It took a determined effort to redeem and rescue Israel from Egypt. And it took a determined effort for Father God to redeem you and me from the allure of the world and the power of the devil. Redemption came at a price. It cost the life of every firstborn in Egypt. But for you and me, who live under the New Covenant, it cost the life of Jesus, God’s only Son.

Response: Father God, thank you for the effort expended to rescue me from the grip of sin. I appreciate you, Lord Jesus. You were willing to lay down your life for me. What awesome, undeserved love! Amen.

Your Turn: Do you appreciate the New Covenant that was sealed by the blood of Christ? How do you show your appreciation?

* New International Version, Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica

The first volume of Psalms 365: Develop a Life of Worship and Prayer by award-winning author David Kitz is now available. For a closer look at this 262-page daily devotional book click here.

Mourning to Gladness

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Today’s quote and prayer from Psalms 365
a redemptive God 365 Psalm 105cHeavenly Father,
when bad news comes
give me a thankful heart and a right perspective.
Your ways are higher than mine.
You know the end before the beginning starts.
I choose to trust you.
Amen.

The first volume of Psalms 365: Develop a Life of Worship and Prayer by award-winning author David Kitz is now available. For a closer look at this 262-page daily devotional book click here.

Great Good from Negative Experiences

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Reading: Psalm 105
(Verses 16-22)
He called down famine on the land
and destroyed all their supplies of food;
and he sent a man before them—
Joseph, sold as a slave.
They bruised his feet with shackles,
his neck was put in irons,
till what he foretold came to pass,
till the word of the L
ORD proved him true.
The king sent and released him,
the ruler of peoples set him free.
He made him master of his household,
ruler over all he possessed,
to instruct his princes as he pleased
and teach his elders wisdom
(NIV).*

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Snow & ice formations — photo by David Kitz

Reflection
Here is a question for you. Is bad news always bad news, or is it good news in disguise?

Sometimes what initially appears to be a very bad change of circumstances can over time turn out for the better. The story of the patriarch, Joseph, illustrates this truth perfectly. No one would be foolish enough to call Joseph’s betrayal by his brothers a good news event. Being sold as a foreign slave in Egypt was in many respects a death sentence. How could something good or meaningful come from the life of an obscure young slave?

But that obscure young slave rose above his circumstances and changed the course of nations. His faith and actions more than three millennia ago still have ramifications for us today. How would Egypt have survived seven years of famine without the foresight and wisdom of Joseph? Would there be a Jewish nation today without the guiding hand of Joseph, who was strategically positioned at such a critical time in history?

What began as a bad news story, turned into the salvation of a nation. Joseph told his brothers, “You intended to harm me, but God intended it for good to accomplish what is now being done, the saving of many lives” (Genesis 50:20).

Sometimes I wonder what thoughts, hopes and dreams sustained Joseph during his darkest hours. God most certainly was with him. He did not go down to Egypt alone. When we receive bad news, is it always genuinely bad? If God is with us in the hard times, great good may yet come from our most negative experiences. He is a redemptive God who turns darkness to light, mourning to gladness, and curses into blessings. Keep these thoughts in mind during the hardships of this current pandemic. Surely, this is why St. Paul admonishes us with these words: give thanks in all circumstances; for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus (1 Thessalonians 5:18).

Response: Father God, when bad news comes give me a thankful heart and a right perspective. Your ways are higher than mine. You know the end before the beginning starts. I choose to trust you. Amen.

Your Turn: Over time has the Lord turned bad news into good news for you? How did that make you feel?

* New International Version, Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica

The first volume of Psalms 365: Develop a Life of Worship and Prayer by award-winning author David Kitz is now available. For a closer look at this 262-page daily devotional book click here.

As We Begin Lent…

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An Amazon Review
I’ve read this book and enjoyed it. It is biblically accurate and any dramatization never went beyond the realm of reality and plausibility. The thorough research behind the writing is quite obvious.4485 SHARABLE-2

Kitz keeps a tight pace through the narrative and keeps it true to the spirit of Jesus Christ’s life, death, and resurrection without ever getting preachy.

I wished there were more books like this. It’s a historical fiction, for sure, but there was nothing within the fiction that would contradict what the Gospels in the Bible describe.

Best of all, the book is intended for general readership and not restricted to Christians. For anyone who would like to enjoy an immensely readable, dramatic, emotional, and accurate account of Easter and the time leading up to it, I highly recommend “The Soldier Who Killed a King.” For Christians, it’s a great read for Lent and Easter.                 — Fast Eddie

To download a free study guide for this high-impact, bible-based novel visit: https://www.davidkitz.ca/centurion.php/free study guide PDF

For book purchases of The Soldier Who Killed a King try Amazon or christianbook.com.